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Honda uses Dies to cast their engines.. that's leaves holes

specifically around the cylinder walls.. so fluid can cool off the walls and stuff.. but under heavy loads.. like in a turbo or high boost application, those "sleaves' flex a little.. and that is BAD.. so a block gaurd prevents that by being stuck in there and creating a solid structure for the cylinder sleaves to be up against. don't just through one in your car.. it's a good idea to have a pro do it, so that he/she can make sure the cylinders havn't warped during installation and they can bore the cylinders if that's happened
 

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this is a block guard....it protects the upper portion of the cylinder walls
 

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you woud be able to boost up 14-15lbs. if you any more you might want to think about resleeving the block. when boosting this high it is important to have an adequate amount of fuel that is tuned.
 

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yups...rods/pistons/block guard/head gasket/ good amt of fuel that is controlled/ correct timing....you can go up to 15lbs, thats as much as the block can handle b4 you have to get it resleeved. you also might want to get a standalone computer sustem that controls the fuel and timing.
 

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knowing how much boost you can run depends on a lot of factors, like your intercooler size and length and diameter or the charge pipes. it also depends on how much you lower the compression with the pistons and headgasket.

using a blockguard is a cheap way of reinforcing your block, the better route to go would be to sleeve the block but this can become costly. the major draw back to a blockguard is that it prevents coolant flow to the head and with an alumn head you could actually warp it under high temps. but if you look at the pic they now have "venting" holes in the guard to help prevent this. another thing i have heard blockguards doing is what is called walking. under highpressures and continous use it, you can actually have the blockguard slide down the "channel" and then its not really serving any purpose but blocking some coolant flow.

what you should do is read all the tech articles on this site:
http://www.theoldone.com

i hope i helped you
 

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crxrocks said:
Yes and there is also the possibility of the blockguard creating 'hot spots' at the top of the cylinder walls. This can result in detonation or pre-ignition.

I wouldn't use a blockguard, personally.

Chris
that is true as well...
i think if your going to use a blockguard, make sure you have one with the "vents" and make sure your coolant flow is good, your engine thermom is new and maybe go a level colder, and make sure your radiator is in good shape.
 

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best way to control fuel is a standalone ecu.....zdyne/pms/hondata etc.
 

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I have an STR Blockguard installed in my ZC motor. I put it in before I installed my NOS kit. I figured it would be a good insurance policy against detonation. I haven't had ANY problems with it, and that was about 25,000 miles ago. Also, i didn't want to get any sleeve walking while I was on the bottle.
 

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I would highly recommend if you are considering a block guard that the engine be for primarily race purposes, and that you have one welded in by a machine shop or engine building shop. I know for Kristian this would probably not be a horrible idea, but it would be a better idea to have the block sleeved.:)
 

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Blockguards Reduce cooling in the top of the cylinder wall (where its most hot) Plus, pounding in a block guard can distort the shape of the sleeves very easily.

As far as I know, no one makes a block guard for a ZC. it is not the same as a d16a6/z6 or any of the other D-series engines. If you were to buy one for a d16a6 and put it in your zc it would slide right to the bottom (I bought 2 of them nuformz/str) both did the same.


Sleeving a block is probably the best way to go, but can be very costly. Their is also 1 other option, Posting/Pinning support. Nascar uses this on just about all their engines. its basically drilling through the outer casting of the block and tapping in threads that go through the outer side of the block and just touch the inner cylinder wall. (not to much) the pins/studs have to be made out of the same material as the honda block so when it heats up nothing distorts.

I had my ZC block posted/pinned by Endyn, 240 bucks (inc shipping) This is what larry (T.o.o) uses on his d16z6 20+ psi civic (daily driven). where do they mount the posts? Apparently Larry explained to me that they have found they have calculated the point of maximum piston side thrust on both the primary and secondary thrust axis. not the top of the cylinder wall, its about 3/4 of the way up.

here is a pic.



12 studs total, and sealed by epoxy.

Jeff
www.homemadeturbo.com
 

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When I installed my Blockguard in, I had absolutely no problem with installing it, and having it slide to the bottom. If you install the blockguard upside down, which I did at first, it will slide downt he cylinder walls, but if you install it properly, it will sit nicely on very top of the cylinder wall. There was no pounding or prodding, etc. to get it fit.

And like I said before, I have never had one problem with it in the past 25,000 miles.
 
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