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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The distributor's cap and rotor need to be replaced when the rotor and terminals in the cap have become worn/corroded and prevent enough electric charge to pass trough the spark plug wires to the spark plugs (you can brush the corrosion off with a wirebrush). This preventive maintenance will improve combustion and help your car feel "smoother" among other things. Note: the following procedure was performed on a 3rd gen integra but it will be similar on other hondas.

Materials: new cap and rotor from your local auto parts store (the cap normally comes with new retaining screws and a new seal, if it doesn't use your old ones).
Tools needed: phillips screwdriver, 8mm wrench, 10mm wrench, pliers(may not need this).


Step 1: This is not really necesary but to be safe I like to disconnect the battery, plus it resets your ECU. Use your 10mm wrench to losen the battery terminals (negative then positive) and disconnect them.


Step 2: Unplug the spark plug wires from the cylinder head (NOT the distributor!)


Step 3: Proceed to remove the distributor cap by unscrewing the retaining bolts with your phillips screwdriver.....


....or you can also use the 8mm wrench.


The lower bolt is kind of hard to get to so I took my intake tube off, this also gives you more room to work with.


After removing the cap you will see the ROTOR


Step 4: Under the rotor there is a screw, remove it (rotor has to be in a certain position to do this)....


....or if the rotor didn't "land" on the right position to unscrew it, or if you're like me and stripped it, brake the rotor off with some pliers, then you can get to the screw by removing the little cover with the spring, make sure you replace the cover afterwards.


I had to use a needle nose to loosen the stripped screw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Step 5: Remove the rotor (or what's left of it) from the distributor shaft.


Step 6: Install new rotor, don't worry about messing up, it can only go in one way.

Step 7: Reinstall rotor screw.


NOTE: If you stripped your screw you're gonna have to improvise until you can get a replacement one. I used one of the new screws that came with the new cap (luckily it had the same threading), although is twice the lenght its working fine so far but I wouldn't recommend it, I don't know what can happen.

Step 8: Remove the old seal and replace with the new one.


Here is a comparison of the two caps, notice the worn terminals on the old cap.


Step 9: Relocate the spark plug wires on the new cap one by one in the same order as the old cap. These wires need to go in a specific sequence so if you removed them and don't know where they go refer to the picture below for the correct order. The correct firing order is 1-3-4-2 so starting clockwise from the bottom left of the cap is 1. On a SOHC motor the #1 is at the top left, same firing order.


Step 10: Install the new cap (tighten the screws hand tight, you don't want the plastic to break, but not loose either).


Step 11: Replace the spark plug wires on the engine. Here is the firing order for reference.


Step 12: Reinstall the battery cables (positive then negative), and all other equipment you may have taken off.

Step 13: Start your car and let it idle for a few minutes.

~THE END~
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: D16Y5

radicalrider said:
Do you know anyone or have you seen any articles regarding engine swaps (i.e. B18C, D16Y8) for a D165? Mine has exceeded its predicted Mean-Time-Failure rate. I am using too much damn oil and I want a higher performing engine.
Please keep it on topic, this is the wrong forum to ask that question but I'll help you anyway. Go to the HYBRID/JDM forum in here, it should have what you need to know about that. Here is a start:
http://www.superhonda.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=58130
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
GreenLantern said:
as a note to that if the rotor screw doesnt land in the right position turn key for one second then turn it off untill its in hte right position
You can do that if you want but it'll take you hours to get it right... why do that when you could just break the rotor off? you're gonna replace it anyway. Another less simple way of doing this is by turning the crank until it lines up right but I don't recommend it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
mad-ass said:
red X owns you. fix and i shill delete my post :)

edit: if you know where i am from...[OT SHO]
you'll learn not to do so :lol
Damn that was a long time ago when SHO didn't have image hosting, so the pics are with imagestation, I haven't used imagestation in years and I'm surprised those pics still work...

On a side note, the pictures are working so STFU :ninja


:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
tmak_ said:
About the Rotor not being in the proper position, I got this tip from D-series.org

"If you cannot see the screw, feel for it and find out where it is. Put the car into gear and rock it back and forth. You will notice the rotor start to move. Do this until you see the screw. This is faster than turning the crank."

Anyone try this yet?
Is it really that hard to just brake the old rotor off?
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
OblivionLord said:
Unless you have some mechanical default with your distributor cap and/or rotor then you shouldn't need to replace either. Their designed to have an understandable amount of wear while still allowing the most optimal transference of potential difference to the plug.

I realize that both parts are relatively inexpensive, but what reason would you follow the books recommended maintenance only because it tells you to change out the part. In order for the parts to show any recognizable signs of duress through engine performance, you would have to have a faulty part or mechanical issue which then worries me of other, more important, engine issues. I wonder how much you would allow your wallet to be raped simply because the dealer told you any procedure was recommended.
Ok, first of all umm who the fuck are you?

Second, you have to be a newb to not know when and why you need to replace wear and tear parts such as this.

Third, this particular part does not usually need to be replaced often, and is inexpensive. So your "wallet rape" theory is just dumb, if you take it to a dealer to get this procedure done then you deserve your wallet to get raped as it is a simple procedure, not much more difficult than replacing a spare tire...

This thread is designed to help begginers understand how this part works, and help them with installation/removal, NOT to give a specific interval for replacing the part.

Also I wrote this almost 4yrs ago so gimme a break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
OblivionLord said:
If this room was only about installation then why would you show before and after pictures of the parts? You did put in comments concerning reasons as to why it should be changed. I was just elaborating to help the "Newbs" understand "why you need to replace ... parts like this". They should be made aware that if their cap and rotor are truly in significant need of replacement then they should look towards other issues as to the cause other than simple wear and tear which would not give just cause for replacement.

For example.. A cylinder wall within the engine can be worn, but unless there's some other major mechanical issue, then it would not have to be replaced or have pistons replace simply because it is worn. If you have reason to change the pistons or sheath the cylinders then the mechanic should look for the cause of that realizing that normal wear and tear would not be the issue.

If you understood what I was saying about the "wallet raping" then you would know that I wasn't just talking about the cap and rotor, but "All recommended dealer replacement services".
You are comparing a cylinder wall (with is NOT considered a "wear and tear" part) with a distributor cap... I rest my case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
95integrars said:
if you have someone there they can watch the rotor to see if it's aligned correctly. it took me less than 30 seconds to get it. i don't know about breaking the rotor off with pliers but if u got no choice then i guess it's ok. the hard part about replacing the rotor is that fucking screw. it's such a bitch to get it loose. like a lot of u i also stripped the shit out of it. i had to use a drill to make new screw slots. then i was able to take it off with a flathead screw driver. i replaced it with a new screw.
At the time, I was going by my experiences with that... I tried to land it on the right spot by bliping the starter, it took too long plus I don't like to overwork it. Breaking the top of the rotor does 2 things for you: 1) it's quicker and 2) it gives you better leverage on the screw to minimize stripping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
k0rupt_ed said:
thats what i do when i replace the rotor, just let someone watch it
What if you need to change it and there's no one around to "watch it" for you?
What's easier?!
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
k0rupt_ed said:
turn it and take a look only takes like 5 or so tries
Hm it took me longer... I just think that if you have the replacement rotor right there, and you are not going to need the old one, it's 5x easier/faster to just break it off (going by your method).

crank over method = 5 tries
break off method = 1 try

... yep.

And if you want to do it by the book, you are supposed to take the wheel off, splash cover, and turn the crank pulley (in the correct direction) until it lines up, I'm offering a simpler and more efficient way to do this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
OblivionLord said:
Since a cylinder wall is not indefinite and does wear then exactly what do you consider to be a "wear and tear" part?
Brake pads, spark plugs, tires, dizzy cap and rotor, oil, coolant, power steer/brake fluid, transmission fluid, oil filter, air filter, fuel filter, wiper blades, timing belt, A/C compressor belt, alternator belt, battery, etc. are all "wear and tear" things in your car that are expected to need replacement at certain times.

Parts such as a cylinder wall are not expected to require replacement during the life of an engine, and therefore not considered "wear and tear"... get it now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
OblivionLord said:
"cylinder wall are not expected to require replacement during the life of an engine"

This is an untrue statement. As I said before.. a Cylinder Wall is not indefinite therefore it will wear as well as Pistons, Valves, Crankshaft, Rods, etc etc which also are all moving parts that are expected to be replaced the older the engine gets.

If a Valve is bad.. do you just trash the whole engine? Of course not. You replace it.
Hence the term "expected" to need replacement...

I don't think I'm going to get through to you kid. Please continue to dwell in your blissful ignorance. /
 
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