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Unless you have some mechanical default with your distributor cap and/or rotor then you shouldn't need to replace either. Their designed to have an understandable amount of wear while still allowing the most optimal transference of potential difference to the plug.

I realize that both parts are relatively inexpensive, but what reason would you follow the books recommended maintenance only because it tells you to change out the part. In order for the parts to show any recognizable signs of duress through engine performance, you would have to have a faulty part or mechanical issue which then worries me of other, more important, engine issues. I wonder how much you would allow your wallet to be raped simply because the dealer told you any procedure was recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
OblivionLord said:
Unless you have some mechanical default with your distributor cap and/or rotor then you shouldn't need to replace either. Their designed to have an understandable amount of wear while still allowing the most optimal transference of potential difference to the plug.

I realize that both parts are relatively inexpensive, but what reason would you follow the books recommended maintenance only because it tells you to change out the part. In order for the parts to show any recognizable signs of duress through engine performance, you would have to have a faulty part or mechanical issue which then worries me of other, more important, engine issues. I wonder how much you would allow your wallet to be raped simply because the dealer told you any procedure was recommended.
Ok, first of all umm who the fuck are you?

Second, you have to be a newb to not know when and why you need to replace wear and tear parts such as this.

Third, this particular part does not usually need to be replaced often, and is inexpensive. So your "wallet rape" theory is just dumb, if you take it to a dealer to get this procedure done then you deserve your wallet to get raped as it is a simple procedure, not much more difficult than replacing a spare tire...

This thread is designed to help begginers understand how this part works, and help them with installation/removal, NOT to give a specific interval for replacing the part.

Also I wrote this almost 4yrs ago so gimme a break.
 

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If this room was only about installation then why would you show before and after pictures of the parts? You did put in comments concerning reasons as to why it should be changed. I was just elaborating to help the "Newbs" understand "why you need to replace ... parts like this". They should be made aware that if their cap and rotor are truly in significant need of replacement then they should look towards other issues as to the cause other than simple wear and tear which would not give just cause for replacement.

For example.. A cylinder wall within the engine can be worn, but unless there's some other major mechanical issue, then it would not have to be replaced or have pistons replace simply because it is worn. If you have reason to change the pistons or sheath the cylinders then the mechanic should look for the cause of that realizing that normal wear and tear would not be the issue.

If you understood what I was saying about the "wallet raping" then you would know that I wasn't just talking about the cap and rotor, but "All recommended dealer replacement services".
 

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Cautela said:
You can do that if you want but it'll take you hours to get it right... why do that when you could just break the rotor off? you're gonna replace it anyway. Another less simple way of doing this is by turning the crank until it lines up right but I don't recommend it.
if you have someone there they can watch the rotor to see if it's aligned correctly. it took me less than 30 seconds to get it. i don't know about breaking the rotor off with pliers but if u got no choice then i guess it's ok. the hard part about replacing the rotor is that fucking screw. it's such a bitch to get it loose. like a lot of u i also stripped the shit out of it. i had to use a drill to make new screw slots. then i was able to take it off with a flathead screw driver. i replaced it with a new screw.
 

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95integrars said:
if you have someone there they can watch the rotor to see if it's aligned correctly. it took me less than 30 seconds to get it. i don't know about breaking the rotor off with pliers but if u got no choice then i guess it's ok. the hard part about replacing the rotor is that fucking screw. it's such a bitch to get it loose. like a lot of u i also stripped the shit out of it. i had to use a drill to make new screw slots. then i was able to take it off with a flathead screw driver. i replaced it with a new screw.
thats what i do when i replace the rotor, just let someone watch it
 

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Discussion Starter #26
OblivionLord said:
If this room was only about installation then why would you show before and after pictures of the parts? You did put in comments concerning reasons as to why it should be changed. I was just elaborating to help the "Newbs" understand "why you need to replace ... parts like this". They should be made aware that if their cap and rotor are truly in significant need of replacement then they should look towards other issues as to the cause other than simple wear and tear which would not give just cause for replacement.

For example.. A cylinder wall within the engine can be worn, but unless there's some other major mechanical issue, then it would not have to be replaced or have pistons replace simply because it is worn. If you have reason to change the pistons or sheath the cylinders then the mechanic should look for the cause of that realizing that normal wear and tear would not be the issue.

If you understood what I was saying about the "wallet raping" then you would know that I wasn't just talking about the cap and rotor, but "All recommended dealer replacement services".
You are comparing a cylinder wall (with is NOT considered a "wear and tear" part) with a distributor cap... I rest my case.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
95integrars said:
if you have someone there they can watch the rotor to see if it's aligned correctly. it took me less than 30 seconds to get it. i don't know about breaking the rotor off with pliers but if u got no choice then i guess it's ok. the hard part about replacing the rotor is that fucking screw. it's such a bitch to get it loose. like a lot of u i also stripped the shit out of it. i had to use a drill to make new screw slots. then i was able to take it off with a flathead screw driver. i replaced it with a new screw.
At the time, I was going by my experiences with that... I tried to land it on the right spot by bliping the starter, it took too long plus I don't like to overwork it. Breaking the top of the rotor does 2 things for you: 1) it's quicker and 2) it gives you better leverage on the screw to minimize stripping.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
k0rupt_ed said:
thats what i do when i replace the rotor, just let someone watch it
What if you need to change it and there's no one around to "watch it" for you?
What's easier?!
 

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turn it and take a look only takes like 5 or so tries
 

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Discussion Starter #30
k0rupt_ed said:
turn it and take a look only takes like 5 or so tries
Hm it took me longer... I just think that if you have the replacement rotor right there, and you are not going to need the old one, it's 5x easier/faster to just break it off (going by your method).

crank over method = 5 tries
break off method = 1 try

... yep.

And if you want to do it by the book, you are supposed to take the wheel off, splash cover, and turn the crank pulley (in the correct direction) until it lines up, I'm offering a simpler and more efficient way to do this.
 

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Cautela said:
You are comparing a cylinder wall (with is NOT considered a "wear and tear" part) with a distributor cap... I rest my case.
Since a cylinder wall is not indefinite and does wear then exactly what do you consider to be a "wear and tear" part?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
OblivionLord said:
Since a cylinder wall is not indefinite and does wear then exactly what do you consider to be a "wear and tear" part?
Brake pads, spark plugs, tires, dizzy cap and rotor, oil, coolant, power steer/brake fluid, transmission fluid, oil filter, air filter, fuel filter, wiper blades, timing belt, A/C compressor belt, alternator belt, battery, etc. are all "wear and tear" things in your car that are expected to need replacement at certain times.

Parts such as a cylinder wall are not expected to require replacement during the life of an engine, and therefore not considered "wear and tear"... get it now?
 

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"cylinder wall are not expected to require replacement during the life of an engine"

This is an untrue statement. As I said before.. a Cylinder Wall is not indefinite therefore it will wear as well as Pistons, Valves, Crankshaft, Rods, etc etc which also are all moving parts that are expected to be replaced the older the engine gets.

If a Valve is bad.. do you just trash the whole engine? Of course not. You replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
OblivionLord said:
"cylinder wall are not expected to require replacement during the life of an engine"

This is an untrue statement. As I said before.. a Cylinder Wall is not indefinite therefore it will wear as well as Pistons, Valves, Crankshaft, Rods, etc etc which also are all moving parts that are expected to be replaced the older the engine gets.

If a Valve is bad.. do you just trash the whole engine? Of course not. You replace it.
Hence the term "expected" to need replacement...

I don't think I'm going to get through to you kid. Please continue to dwell in your blissful ignorance. /
 

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"Hence the term "expected" to need replacement"

As I also said above dealing with an expected replacement inside the engine.

Your views are clearly different than mine. If you just follow the books suggested interval changes for preventable maintenance or take the word from a certified tech for all the little things that they consider to be replaced over time then your going to run into unnecessary expenses.

Now I'll re quote my second post on this thread which is the whole reason why I had to respond.

"They should be made aware that if their cap and rotor are truly in significant need of replacement then they should look towards other issues as to the cause other than simple wear and tear which would not give just cause for replacement."
 

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jeez...
I replaced mine, cranked it about 4 times.
If i have the option of breaking something to fix it or not breaking something I will try the clean method first. Takes less than 5 min either way. Theres no right way to do it. To each his own
 

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I agree with everyone else this should not be that much trouble at all. but if everyone is having a hard time with it as some seem. you could always mark a line on the distributor to the top of the head. remove the distributor with all three 12mm bolts and turn it by hand. then when your done just put it back on the engine and line the 2 lines back up together so that way you will not have to re-time the engine. thats not the easiest rout but it would sure make it easier to line up than putting the car in gear and rocking it back and forth.
 

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What about the rotors with NO screw?

Hey, I've been looking around and searching everywhere, but no one has mentioned having a dizzy like mine, for the 85 HF carbed engine. Did cap and rotor yesterday, and here's where it gets funky. Rotor just pops off and slips on to a totally round shaft. No little Allen screw, and no seal between the cap and dizzy itself. The old cap seems to be kind of oily inside, maybe a little rusty? I put the new rotor on ABOUT the same spot as the old one. But I just don't know for sure.
Also when I tried to smog the other day, the guy there loosened the nuts on the dizzy to turn, adjusted my timing.. With no light, DURING the smog process, and since then it's been steadily running rougher and rougher. Come to find, when I thought to try putting it back how it was while I replaced cap and rotor, he left one of the two dizzy bolts NOT EVEN FINGER TIGHT. I don't really wanna drive it like this, now there's a ticking that sounds like valve clatter kind of, a screech coming from SOMEWHERE, high pitched like a belt kind of but it's not the one with the alternator on it... Oh yeah, when I tried to move the dizzy back how it was, with the car running, I got zapped somehow.. I've got plugs and wires on the way, figure that could have been from old spark plug wires arcing into me?
I'm trying to think if there's anything else involving the cap and rotor, but I think that's it for now...
Any thoughts? Need more info? I'm hoping the timing belt hasn't skipped a tooth or something... Going to do that anyway soon as I can cause I don't know when(or even IF) the PO last had that done..
So any ideas or thoughts would be very much appreciated. Like should I go rip this smog guy a new one for being so careless?? In my understanding some serious problems can arise if the dizzy isn't totally cherry... Thanks so much for any support, I know this is kind of an old thread, but I at least wanted to point out the slip on/off rotor that no one seems to be confused over...
 
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