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I just had a OEM spec Exedy clutch and the 7.5Lb Fidanza flywheel put in a little bit ago, and I am impressed by it. I had the assumption that I would stall a lot at first, but it seems easier to drive now than before. The throttle response is awesome and the revs drop really quick. I have not had a chance to launch with it, but from the way it seems now I will not be disappointed. I would suggest this to anybody. The revs rise really quick and drop really quick as well.
 

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less force behind it when you dump the clutch.if someone punches you with say 10lbs of force and then with 20lbs of force there is a difference right?
 

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HBracer said:
less force behind it when you dump the clutch.if someone punches you with say 10lbs of force and then with 20lbs of force there is a difference right?
What does a punch have to do with torque?
Definitions of Torque on the Web:

The force which tends to cause rotation.
www.supertigre.com/glossary.html

The measure of the force applied to produce rotational motion usually measured in foot-pounds. Torque is determined by multiplying the applied force by the distance from the pivot point to the point where the force is applied.
www.simpsonanchors.com/catalog/information/glossary.html

A twisting action in torsion springs which tends to produce rotation, equal to the load multiplied by the distance (or moment arm) from the load to the axis of the spring body.
www.generalwirespring.com/glossary.html

The rotational equivalent of force, measured in pound-feet.
www.clublexus.com/index.php/article/archive/119/168

The product of a force applied through a lever arm to produce a rotating or turning motion.
www.tiresafety.com/glossary/GlossComp.asp

is to turn the bow to one side when aiming or releasing the arrow.
tucsonarchery.com/Archery_Terms.php

Force exerted in rotation.
www.yourwebassistant.net/glossary/t7.htm

Torsional moment or couple. It usually refers to the driving couple of a machine or motor.
www.pneumatic-source.com/resources/glossary/t.shtml
 

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you lose "punch" off the line with a lighter flywheel because there is not as much inertia stored in the flywheel when you dump the clutch...

Anyways, this is the review forum, so lets keep the discussion on the topic of this particular flywheel. Generic questions/concerns about lightweight fly's can be handled in any of the other tech forums.
 

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HBracer said:
less force behind it when you dump the clutch.if someone punches you with say 10lbs of force and then with 20lbs of force there is a difference right?
You are refering to inertia

Definitions of Inertia on the Web:

The property of matter to resists accleration or deceleration, ie any motion which is not in a straight line and with constant velocity
www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/stargaze/Fgloss.htm

A property of matter that causes it to resist changes in speed or direction (velocity).
science.nasa.gov/newhome/help/glossary.htm

A descriptive term for that property of a body which resists change in its motion. Two kinds of changes of motion are recognized: changes in translational motion, and changes in rotational motion.
www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/glossary.htm

The reluctance of any object to change its state of motion. Mass is the measure of inertia.
www.mdk12.org/mspp/vsc/science/bygrade/glossary.shtml

Inertia is a property of matter: a mass at rest remains at rest and a mass in motion remains in motion as long as no outside force acts upon it. INDEX CATALOG The Index Catalogs are two supplements to the New General Catalog, listing nebulae and star clusters with an IC number. These supplements were published in 895 and 1908. INFERIOR PLANETS Mercury and Venus are called inferior planets because they are closer to the Sun than Earth. [Planets that are farther from the Sun than Earth are called superior planets.]
www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/astronomy/glossary/indexi.shtml

The tendency of an object at rest to remain at rest, and of an object in motion to remain in motion.
urban.arch.virginia.edu/~km6e/references/glossary/struc-glossary.html

Inertia is a tendency of an object to resist change in its state of motion. More massive objects have more inertia; that is, they have more tendency to resist changes in the way they are moving. An elephant has a lot of inertia, for example. If it is at rest, it offers a large resistance to changes in its state of rest, and so it's difficult to move an elephant. On the other hand, a pencil has a small amount of inertia. It's easy to move a pencil from its state of rest. More massive objects have more inertia and
www.learner.org/exhibits/parkphysics/glossary.html
 
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