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Hi, I just bought a del sol si vtec and just filled the gas tank for the first time. I noticed that it said use premium gasoline only. Is this true? Do you guys use premium gas? just wondering thanks for the info.
 

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delsol17 said:
aren't si vtec anyways???hello are ya dumb??
don't be a dick

and yes the si is a vtec but it's a SOHC d-series

The DOHC VTEC engine (B16A2-3) is in the VTEC del sol, don't confuse it with the Civic SI (99-00) w/ a B16A3. It's a different name.
 

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Using higher Octane is good anyway if you plane on doing a lot of engine work in the Future. A.k.a Turbo.
 

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i always use premium. i like it. if i can't get it or if i'm really low on cash then i'll just get regular octane.
 

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AndrewD65 said:
Using higher Octane is good anyway if you plane on doing a lot of engine work in the Future. A.k.a Turbo.

if the turbo is there, thats basically the equivelant of a higher compression motor, and therefore necessitates higher octane gas

higer octane=burns slower

so if you run too high octane you will spew out plenty of unburned hydrocarbons that will make you fail emissions and destroy your cat... you also increase chances of backfiring etc....

these negative effects are usually minimal if not non-apparant, but the risk is there... the most apparent effect will be a slightly lighter wallet...

the biggest risk is running too low octane and knocking your motor to shit... if it says premium, use premium, if it says regular, use regular...

why is it so fucking hard for people to follow simple instructions? :bh
 

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higer octane=burns slower
Negative. It helps resist pre-ignition due to pressure. High compression tends to promote pre-ignition. Higher octane helps resist pre-ignition due to pressure, allowing the flame wall to move through the vapors. From the article:

6.3 What fuel property does the Octane Rating measure?

The fuel property the octane ratings measure is the ability of the unburnt
end gases to spontaneously ignite under the specified test conditions.
Within the chemical structure of the fuel is the ability to withstand
pre-flame conditions without decomposing into species that will autoignite
before the flame-front arrives. Different reaction mechanisms, occurring at
various stages of the pre-flame compression stroke, are responsible for the
undesirable, easily-autoignitable, end gases.

On the issue of using higher octane for more power...........

6.13 Can higher octane fuels give me more power?

On modern engines with sophisticated engine management systems, the engine can operate efficiently on fuels of a wider range of octane rating, but there remains an optimum octane for the engine under specific driving conditions. Older cars without such systems are more restricted in their choice of fuel, as the engine can not automatically adjust to accommodate lower octane fuel. Because knock is so destructive, owners of older cars must use fuel that will not knock under the most demanding conditions they encounter, and must continue to use that fuel, even if they only occasionally require the octane.

If you are already using the proper octane fuel, you will not obtain more
power from higher octane fuels. The engine will be already operating at
optimum settings, and a higher octane should have no effect on the management system. Your driveability and fuel economy will remain the same. The higher octane fuel costs more, so you are just throwing money away. If you are already using a fuel with an octane rating slightly below the optimum, then using a higher octane fuel will cause the engine management system to move to the optimum settings, possibly resulting in both increased power and improved fuel economy. You may be able to change octanes between seasons ( reduce octane in winter ) to obtain the most cost-effective fuel without loss of driveability.

Once you have identified the fuel that keeps the engine at optimum settings,
there is no advantage in moving to an even higher octane fuel. The
manufacturer's recommendation is conservative, so you may be able to
carefully reduce the fuel octane. The penalty for getting it badly wrong,
and not realising that you have, could be expensive engine damage.
 
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