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phuck big brake kits.....MOST street cars do not need them plus the hurt performance, i've seen dynos where a big brake kit was installed and the car lost 3-6hp across the band.

Go with OEM rotors or brembo blanks, to further protect against warping and increase longevity have them cryo-treated.

OEM pads are good too, no noise = good....if you track or auto and need fade-resistant look into some hawk pads.

Personally i'd go w/ brembo blanks (cuase you can get them keep) and hawk hps pads (low noise, better friction compound than oem.)
 

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Me and my buddy just put brembo drilled rotors and EBC green stuff pads on the front of his 1998 prelude base and they work awsome.. easy install and they are very effective not any bigger then stock the rotors for 2 front are 219 and the pads were 80 and it stops rather quickly..
 

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don't get drilled / slotted rotors, they don't help at all in our cars.

if you want more stopping power, get a true big brake kit.

kits from fastbrakes, stoptech are about as much as any person who tracks their car would need to go.

stick with brembo blanks / good pads unless you want to spend more than 900 bux. anything in between is not worth it.
 

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ill be willing to put money on it that the drilled and slotted help out on his car..
 

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^i'll take that bet.

drill / slotted rotors were made back in the day when brake gases would heat up to a point where it was detrimental. so thats why there are slots or holes or both to help those gases escape.

nowadays, we have better materials / processes / etc. why would you want to take away surface area used to brake???? if this is a straight track car, then MAYBE he might opt for it if he got a real BBK.

funny how even honda challenge h1 preludes are still running stock calipers / autozone rotors huh? they just run great pads. i personally have seen two h-class NASA 5th gen preludes with this setup.

not to mention you can't resurface these rotors. so if you get warped rotors, you are fuxored.
 

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IM sorry to burst your bubble but me know a thng or 2 about brakes and have machined slottled rotors u can and they still funtion as effectivly as they did before and as for warping rotors u can warp any rotor so bad u can machine it to the proper parrelism.... u have to use a gauge and spin the rotor and see how many thousands it out of parrel if u can machine so many thousands off to make it the same all the way around u can but if not sorry any rotor is SOL... and about the calipers i never said anything about calipers... stock Oem Honda calipers are great never had any problems with them.. and if they run stock factory rotors then thy use Hawk pad the pads are eventually goinng to chew them up... Oh and i am ASE brake certified.. thanks..
 

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but unless his car is gonna be seeing alot of the track (which is where this type of brake setup will shine), x-drilled and slotted rotors are a little overkill

i would just stick to brembo blanks and a good set of pads, like hawk or something
 

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Prelude92Si said:
IM sorry to burst your bubble but me know a thng or 2 about brakes and have machined slottled rotors u can and they still funtion as effectivly as they did before and as for warping rotors u can warp any rotor so bad u can machine it to the proper parrelism.... u have to use a gauge and spin the rotor and see how many thousands it out of parrel if u can machine so many thousands off to make it the same all the way around u can but if not sorry any rotor is SOL... and about the calipers i never said anything about calipers... stock Oem Honda calipers are great never had any problems with them.. and if they run stock factory rotors then thy use Hawk pad the pads are eventually goinng to chew them up... Oh and i am ASE brake certified.. thanks..
so i don't care, ASE certification doesn't mean anything to me. my dads an airplane mechanic and some of his new employees are all certified but still dont' know crap about single props. and how many horror stories have we all heard about honda dealership mechanics which are all ASE certified as well.

you stated the cross - drilled rotors will make a difference. i said it won't.

quoted from a faq

Cross-Drilled /Slotted Rotors

The second thing you can do to improve your brake performance is often to go to a larger rotor. We all know that this gives the rotor further ability to dissipate heat away from the pads through itself and through the air (conductive and convective heat transfer). So obviously a larger pad, a larger rotor, or both result in better brake performance by avoiding brake fade.

But what about cross drilled or slotted rotors? Well the common belief in the main stream is that somehow slotted or cross-drilled rotors allow for better performance by handling heat. This is 100 percent false. The individuals involved in such fallacies mention that air through the holes or slots work to cool the rotor (convective heat transfer into the air from the rotor). The issue is that from physics we know that metal transfers heat better then air by a significant amount. As such the larger mass of the rotor becomes more important then the larger surface area of the rotor in any situation other then the optimal. Cross drilling and slotting rotors are not optimal manners of creating metal to air transfer through larger surface areas. There is not much airflow through the holes or slots. Furthermore for cross drilling the holes will fill with brake dust in effect lowering the cooling ability of the rotors vanes they pass through.

oh and i will admit i was wrong about the surface area. i forgot brakes rely on friction and the friction equation doesn't use surface area. so i'll take that hit.
 

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a brake salesman told me that the pads will eat up the stock weak rotors..
 

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Prelude92Si said:
a brake salesman told me that the pads will eat up the stock weak rotors..
ok. so don't get the hp plus's. regular hawk pads won't do this, i know because i had the hawks on the car before. it would still dust like crazy but i never thought it "ate" at the rotors.

point of the matter is, just get some slightly better than stock pads (axxis/pbr, ebc, low hawks) and you will be fine.

you want something better? get brembo blanks and some cobalts
 

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I've heard this argument so many times, and this is the conclussion I've drawn: Drilled and slotted rotors aren't necessary for our cars, and may eat up pads, wear out faster, etc. But I refuse to believe that they are worse at stopping your car. No, I don't have any articles or anything to back it up, but there's got to be a reason why Porsches, Ferraris, Lambos, Vettes, and some of the other best performing cars in the world have them, stock. I'm not talking about some crap rotors, they have to be quality, but they obviously work well or else these companies wouldn't use them. Keep in mind though, that the less surface area is made up by the size of the rotors, because usually these cars have a pretty sizeable rotor. Just my 2 cents.
 

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you could do what i did, and go extreme budget. I bought my rotors from advance auto parts web site for 71 bucks shipped for all four, they were the cheapest ones i could find. I then went to autozone and bought lifetime duralast gold pads for dirt cheap (like 40 bucks or so total). so far they work great. i have no complaints, and they stop just fine. no noise, no warping, just smooth stopping. it sure as hell beats the 450 i spent doing the brakes on my SE with brembo blank rotors and axxis metal masters. and if my pads ever wear out (which they will) i get new ones for free! how can you beat that?
 

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94PreludeJDM said:
I've heard this argument so many times, and this is the conclussion I've drawn: Drilled and slotted rotors aren't necessary for our cars, and may eat up pads, wear out faster, etc. But I refuse to believe that they are worse at stopping your car. No, I don't have any articles or anything to back it up, but there's got to be a reason why Porsches, Ferraris, Lambos, Vettes, and some of the other best performing cars in the world have them, stock. I'm not talking about some crap rotors, they have to be quality, but they obviously work well or else these companies wouldn't use them. Keep in mind though, that the less surface area is made up by the size of the rotors, because usually these cars have a pretty sizeable rotor. Just my 2 cents.
could be an image thing for the purchasers of the cars. they spend a lot on the car, they want something that looks expensive. maybe.
 

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Well just for shits and giggles, back in the day when I bought a brand new 97 Z24 I took it back to the dealership 3 times before it had even 20,000 miles on it because the rotors were shit.

Bought a set of cross-drilled rotors from KVR performance out of Canada and coupled them with oem pads and they lasted 40,000 miles before I even had to think about replacing them and I drove the shit outta that hunk a shit.

They aren't necessary but I'm telling you stock rotors will warp faster than cross-drilled rotors end of story, no need to even debate it.

Can't vouge for slotted/cross-drilled rotors because I've never had them but I'd opt for one or the other not both. Oem pads are the only thing I'd ever buy on my type sh, screw the duralast gold shit (advance/autozone junk ass pads) save those for your 86 accord :lmao

I've pretty much decided that advance and autozone pads eat rotors, especially their rotors.

As far as these high dollar s/c-d rotors not helping our cars that's bs too. All high end racing teams use them, they're made for a purpose and their purpose is well proven, read up
 

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i like how yall all point out high end cars need them / race cars.

i'll be the first to tell you, the prelude isn't any of those :)

even extreme track conditions it MIGHT help.

and i think someone pointed out that yeah, at the cost of those cars, you would want something to look fast and have some serious equipment to justify the cost.

well if carbon ceramic brakes are almost fade free and don't heat up as fast, why would you need cross drilled holes? they should outperform regular crossdrilled rotors.
 

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The reason that the high end cars and race cars have them is because they will see the extreme braking situations that we won't. If you're in a Ferrari ripping up a road course, your rotors and pads are going to get hot as hell, and yes they will release more gas than they would under conditions that our car would see. They're braking harder and from much higher speeds than our cars can. If you think about it from a scientific perspective, cross drilled and slotted rotors provide less surface area on the the rotor which would mean less stopping power. High end cars have bigger rotors, and bigger calipers meaning that they can add brake pad/rotor surface area where they meet allowing for increased braking while still getting the benefits provided by the rotors.

~Peace
 

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IHIPrelude94 said:
The reason that the high end cars and race cars have them is because they will see the extreme braking situations that we won't. If you're in a Ferrari ripping up a road course, your rotors and pads are going to get hot as hell, and yes they will release more gas than they would under conditions that our car would see. They're braking harder and from much higher speeds than our cars can. If you think about it from a scientific perspective, cross drilled and slotted rotors provide less surface area on the the rotor which would mean less stopping power. High end cars have bigger rotors, and bigger calipers meaning that they can add brake pad/rotor surface area where they meet allowing for increased braking while still getting the benefits provided by the rotors.

~Peace
actually.

"The Working of Brakes"

Over the past several years I have seen many myths perpetrated by the main stream. The purpose of this article is to dispel some of those myths while explaining basic concepts. Through the course of this article you will learn about how brakes work. You will also learn the advantages and disadvantages of cross-drilled, slotted, and vented rotors. Lastly, you will learn about brake bias.

There is a common fallacy out there that increasing your brake pad size in terms of swept area will increase the stopping power of your car through greater friction. From a standpoint ignoring operating temperatures this is in fact false. The force of friction is determined by physics as the force down on the object times the coefficient of friction. As such there is no surface area in the friction equation. However, the temperature of the pad varies throughout its use changing the coefficient of friction at each point along its temperature slope in a non-linear/non-progressive manner. As such it is possible that a larger pad will change the friction force favorably given pad makeup. It certainly will change the amount of time before the brakes enter the proper range and when they leave the range. It will also influence when and how long it is at the peak performance point. Meanwhile, modifying the pad material can change this operating range. As such the affect of increase in pad size on braking friction would depend on the makeup of the pad. Also note that the only way to modify the force down is to change the brake piston force (by size changes or number for example).

This does not mean that a larger brake pad does not help braking! The benefit of a large brake pad comes into effect when you consider thermal dissipation. The larger the pad the more this thermal temperature (created by the interaction between the pad and rotor) is spread amongst a pad. This means less temperature is concentrated at one point on the pad and the rotor absorbs more heat. This decreases the likelihood that the pad itself will heat beyond operating temperature. If the pad were to go beyond operating temperature it would glaze over resulting in brake fade. Furthermore, a larger pad results in a longer service life of the pad since there is more pad material to consume.

**Note: This is not to say that a huge pad is the way to go. I am simply telling you the benefits of a bigger pad. Do not. I repeat do not buy a huge pad thinking that will be the end all. However, consider a pad with a better material makeup for a large difference.

Advantages

So what do cross drilled and slotted rotors accomplish? The main original purpose of slotted and cross-drilled rotors was to vent gases that buildup between the pads and the rotors. However, this reasoning is no longer valid. As the years have gone by pads have been designed that produce very little gas. Furthermore many pads come with groves in themselves that allow for the removal of any minor gas that is created. A slotted or drilled rotor always decreases the rotors capability to dissipate heat amongst itself. A slotted or drilled rotor will also clean off the brake pad as it passes the slots at the expense of faster pad wear. As such there are benefits for rally and dirt tracks. Furthermore, the slots or holes themselves can serve to wipe off the top layer of glaze that tends to appear on your brake pads. Some racers say this last part is beneficial while others question whether the slots will fill before the deglaze affect is ever helpful. I have yet to determine the answer to this question.

The answer of slotted and cross-drilled rotor usefulness seems to lie with whether the benefit of cleaning the pads outstrips the loss in heat dissipation. In terms of cross drilling there are so many costs that nothing is accomplished beyond perhaps giving you a certain bling look. In a motorcycle or other extremely light vehicle the decrease in rotational inertia and unsprung mass might perhaps be useful (once other more efficient avenues are exhausted). However, in a street car or race car the speeds and weight of such vehicles will make the relatively miniscule decrease be outweighed by the need for more heat dissipation. Slotted rotors, meanwhile, share the positives of cross drilling but notably are slightly less subject to the costs. They do not impede airflow through the rotors vanes, nor do they have as large an affect on structural rigidity. Therefore, the need for slotting depends on your application.
 

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Thats what i was trying to say but thanks for the back up guys this insnt a argument at all i was just trying to tel him that they do help out quite a bit for warping and stopping..
 

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I run OEM rotors with Hawk HP+ pads.


I have no complaints....expect a lot of brake dust...some brake noise....but I am used to it...and I have a loud car anyway.

Takes a little time to heat the brakes up before getting to optimal running temp.


And people warp stock brake rotors because they are stupid...they don't properly heat up or cool down their brake pads/rotors.
 
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