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Im teaching myself to do bodywork right now, so far ive straightened a badly crushed piece of the car pretty good. Now Im using bondo to smooth it all out. While i was at it i figured that id shave the door moldings too. Does anyone have any tips for this? Do I just fill the gap with bondo or what? Ive seen it done before, how do people normally do this? Do I drill holes to make the bondo stick in there better? Will It crack or mess up after its been sittin on there for a while? I just want to do it so it looks very good and last forever. Somone please give me some pointers or links to a site that shows how to do this.
 

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if you have speedvision, or i guess the speed channel now, you might find a show on there called Ship Shape... they usually do work on boats using fiberglass... you could learn how to do it by watching that show... im guessing you have to strip the paint off your doors and do the moldings, then sand it down to make it flush and then reprime and paint them...
 

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CrazyTegger said:
Im teaching myself to do bodywork right now, so far ive straightened a badly crushed piece of the car pretty good. Now Im using bondo to smooth it all out. While i was at it i figured that id shave the door moldings too. Does anyone have any tips for this? Do I just fill the gap with bondo or what? Ive seen it done before, how do people normally do this? Do I drill holes to make the bondo stick in there better? Will It crack or mess up after its been sittin on there for a while? I just want to do it so it looks very good and last forever. Somone please give me some pointers or links to a site that shows how to do this.
shaving moldings on tegs is much easier than on civis because there isn't a 'dent' in which the molding goes, it's just attached to the car w/screws. to 'shave' the moldings first take them off the car. once they're off you have to weld the holes in (make sure you know what you're doing, it's easier to make the hole bigger than it is to shut it). then you sand the welded holes with some big grit sandpaper so the bondo will stick good. then of course, you bondo the holes to make it smooth and even with the surrounding body area. sand and re-apply bondo as much as you need to so the areas where the holes were are smooth (so you can't even tell there were holes there before). then you sand the quarter panels and doors, primer, sand again, and paint. even if you don't want to repaint the whole car you'll still be painting both of the quarters and doors, just do the whole car if you have enough $ (a good time to paint it a custom color, also to get a body kit).
 
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