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Super Ban-Finger Mod
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Discussion Starter #1
Now that you've completed the 101 course and have a firm grasp of the basic definitions and physics, let's move into the practical section of your Suspension tuning. Remember, there is no ultimate way to tune your suspension. The fine tuning should be done to your own personal driving style and will usually take a few test laps to find the optimal setting. This guide is provided to give a quick rundown on how the changes in your suspension will affect the handling, either putting you in oversteer or understeer mode. To keep things easy to see, the following settings are red for understeer and blue for oversteer modes.

Front Springs Stiffer: Front roll resistance increases, increasing understeer or reducing oversteer
Rear Springs Stiffer: Rear roll resistance increases, increasing oversteer or reducing understeer

Front Stabilizers Stiffer: Front roll resistance increases, increasing understeer or decreasing oversteer. However, cars w/ independant suspensions may experience a reduction in camber change, allowing better tire contact patch compliance w/ the road surface. This reduces the total amount of understeer, but car is still in understeer mode.
Rear Stabilizers Stiffer: Rear roll resistance increases, increasing oversteer or decreasing understeer. However, cars w/ independant suspensions may experience a reduction in camber change, allowing better tire contact patch compliance w/ the road surface. This reduces the total amount of oversteer, but car is still in oversteer mode.

Front Dampers (Bump & Rebound rates not independant) Stiffer: Front roll resistance increases, increasing understeer or reducing oversteer
Rear Dampers (Bump & Rebound rates not independant) Stiffer: Rear roll resistance increases, increasing oversteer or reducing understeer
Suspensions with independant adjustability of Bump and Rebound Rates:
Increase rebound and bump rates: Ride harshness increases. Turn-in is more crisp.
Increase rebound rates only: On bumps, tires may leave track surface.
Increase bump rates only: Body roll resisted; outside tire loaded too quickly; car won't stabilize into a turn.
Decrease rebound and bump rates: Ride harshness decreases; car may float over bumps.
Decrease rebound rates only: On bumps, tires follow track surface more effectively; car may continue to oscillate after bumps.
Decrease bump rates only: Body rolls quickly; car is slower to respond to turn-in

Front Tire Pressure Lower: Lower tire pressure reduces the contact patch (contact patch shifted more to the edges), making the tire slightly less efficient. Less traction on the steering tires increases understeer.
Rear Tire Pressure Lower: Less traction on the rear tires may lead to the rear end sliding out, resulting in oversteer.

Weight Distribution: Tires only have 100% grip capacity available. A larger amount of traction is needed if there is more mass. When turning, moment arms must be taken into consideration since they basically add more forces for the tire to overcome. This is why 50/50 weight distribution is ideal. Under 50/50 distribution, the moment arms can be neglected and only the tire's maximum grip will be the issue.
Forward Weight Distribution: Moment arm loads the front tires which decreases grip capacity and increases understeer.
Rearward Weight Distribution: Moment arm loads rear tires which decreases grip capacity and increases oversteer.
 

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Great post, allthough I am wondering if this apply's only to fwd cars or any other drive layout as well? I have heard different characteristics are seen on different drive layouts.
 

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Super Ban-Finger Mod
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Discussion Starter #3
these work for all cars.
 

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so if you stiffin your car up all the way around that would be the best for road racing tight turns going fast in a fwd car? or just soft somewhat in the front and very stiff in the back to help you swing around turns?
 

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Super Ban-Finger Mod
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Discussion Starter #5
you want a balance. normally you gotta stiffen up the front too because all your weight is there in a fwd car. if you make the rear TOO stiff, then when you hit a bump the rear end will bounce and you could loose control. you should also try to disperse some weight towards the rear but being careful to not add any unneccessary weight.

as for optimal settings, it's up to the driver and how he/she feels comfortable.
 

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Soo what could be the possible answers for below questions?

1) Front Stiff/Rear Stiff
2) Front Medium Soft/Rear Stiff
3) Front Full Soft/Rear Stiff

Keeping in mind,it's a Turbocharged Honda civic...lets presume its a 300-500 whp ride with GT35R. :D
Incase your wondering whats my basic need is,its DRAG.
 
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