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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hope "energy recovery & re-use" = turbo LOL! :hehe



THE FUTURE OF THE FIA FORMULA ONE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP



07.08.2006

At a meeting today between Professor Dr Burkhard Goeschel and Dr Juergen Reul representing the GPMA and Max Mosley representing the FIA, the following was agreed:

i) Engines will be stabilised from the 2006 Chinese Grand Prix. These will be the only engines used from and including the 2007 season.

ii) This means that no further developments of the engines will be allowed other than retuning for the 19,000 rpm limit, to be agreed in each case with the FIA under the terms of the 2008 Formula One Sporting Regulations.

iii) From 2009 the Formula One Technical Regulations will include means to promote fuel efficiency including energy recovery and re-use. All relevant regulations for 2009 will be published no later than December 31, 2006.

iv) GPMA has setup a working group to examine possible future rules for Formula One which will allow a performance advantage to be obtained by means of more efficient use of available energy. These future regulations may include changes to current power units. The FIA and other engine suppliers will join this group.

v) As a result of the above the FIA and GPMA are now in full agreement about the future of the FIA Formula One World Championship.
 

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To me, the rapid and constant technological advancements and impressive cutting edge technology are some of the coolest aspects of F1. All of the incredible new things the teams and tire manufacturers come up with to constantly outdo each other are such a fascinating part of the sport. Things like freezing engine developement and running a spec tire just don't seem like F1 to me. I'm really interested in seeing how this affects the racing next year. Hopefully the racing itself will be more exciting because the constantly changing technology aspect is part of the "drama" of F1 for me and I'm sad to see some of that lost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's kinda a strange mixture of thoughts. The FIA wants to control developmental costs so in the past they killed off things like: fan cars, active suspension, traction control and other driver's aids.

But then on the other hand Bernie & Max come out with statements like (paraphrasing) - "500 million people watch F1 every other week. We're the pinnacle of racing and we expect our teams to conduct themselves as such."

As the sport becomes more corporate they still expect the smaller teams to keep up to the standards of the bigger budgeted ones. It's a real dawinistic type of thing. In a way I feel lucky that F1 can fill it's grid each race. :(

Still I'm not sure where the happy medium lies. :(
 

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Well if they want to be the "pinnacle of motorsport" then why are stopping engine development!?!? :confused
I'm sure the teams will still continue to do some developement on the engines, we just won't see the same kind of progress throughout the season like we usually do. And perhaps limiting the rpms to 19,000 will help with some reliability, but I don't understand how this can be good for the sport. :(
And how is the engine "freeze" supposed to work exactly? If the engines are "stabilised" in China 06, then what about teams that have a poor engine for that weekend? Are they just SOL until 2009?!?!
Spec engine, spec tire, spec ecu... that doesn't sound like F1 to me... sounds more like Indycar! :rolleyes
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There's also a safety element to their ruling. I believe they also wanted to contain engine specs to keep vechicle speeds at the current level. I know the rules are often changed to lower cornering speeds, etc. but I don't know how much of that went into this decision.
 

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Well I'm sure the cars will slow down quite a bit after the switch to a single tire manufacturer. Needless to say, the tires next season will probably be harder and more conservative, plus Bridgestone won't really need to improve the tires much since there's no other tire company to compete with. I wonder if the current Bridgestone teams will have a slight advantage at the start of the next season...
I remember one of the main reasons for switching to a V8 engine this season (besides cost :rolleyes ) was to slow the cars down. But look at the lap times now, they are lapping in the V8's almost as fast as they were in the V10's! :clap
I do understand the safety concerns though, I don't want any of the drivers to get hurt. But I do love the speed of the cars and don't like the idea of them going slower, then again, it's not my ass on the line out there. :lol2
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here's an article I found on one of the sites. I believe it used to be "F1 Insider". For those who've been around, they'll know what I'm talking about. :hehe :ninja

AUGUST 8, 2006

In the overall scheme of things

Although there are still i's to be dotted and t's to be crossed, the basis of a deal over engines for 2007 and 2008 has now been struck between the FIA and the GPMA. This has still to go through the other non-aligned teams and it is possible that one or two might take the opportunity to demand more concessions. This would be a dangerous thing to do because of the many different kinds of payback that a small team could suffer in the years ahead but it might be something that a team like Midland, unsure of its own future, might do in an effort to get cheaper engines or chassis.

The problem is that CVC Capital Partners, the private equity firm that bought control of Formula One Management (FOM), is now beginning to get uppity at the delays in putting together a deal. CVC has seemingly done very little since it took control of the sport, leaving FOM's management to do the business, but recently there have been signs that CVC is becoming more closely involved and has been talking directly to teams and the GPMA about sorting out a deal. CVC wants to get the sport settled down so that it can issue a bond secured with the future revenues of the sport - as FOM previously did back in 1999. This means that CVC would immediately pay off its investment and any future revenues not needed to pay off the bond and the teams would be pure profit. That plan has always been dependent on a deal between FOM, the teams and the FIA. A commercial deal was struck in May but nothing could go ahead without a deal over the rules as well and the endless negotiations over engines have slowed down the process and meant that CVC has not been able to go to the bond markets.

The overall effect of this has been a clear weakening of the position of FOM and with the delays being caused by the FIA and the teams it is fair to speculate that the dragging of feet may have been deliberate as both have things to gain from reducing FOM's influence over the sport.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't really understand the $ side of the business. What I gather is that under the last Concrde Agreement, payments to teams are detemined by among other things:

Previous years standings, grid position, postion at 1/4 1/2 3/4 & finish of the race, etc. etc. and then I think it's dealt out twice a year. So calculations on each teams earnings based on actual racings is wacky! :fear
 

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Doesn't want to butt in on a very well thought out debate and throw in lowly statements... But oh well...

:fu FIA!!! Pinnacle of racing technology my ass! What's with the engine freeze program anyway, so if a team got stuck with a bad engine, they will constantly loose for how many season the freeze program is in effect. That just blows!

BTW, the energy recovery and re-use scheme is definitely hybrid setup. I think it has been discussed somewhere that FIA is interested in the use of hybrid engine tech. The benefit of this scheme is that the engine can be "over charged", producing somewhat like a boost on many open wheel racing such as A1GP. Well, that's definitely high tech... But silly at the same time IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They can always try to negotiate with another engine supplier I guess. :hehe

**Tongue in cheek! :p **
Otherwise if it's Honda, Toyota, BMW, Ferrari, etc. then they'd only have themselves to blame for a terrible powerplant. :hehe
 

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Midi_Amp said:
:fu FIA!!! Pinnacle of racing technology my ass! What's with the engine freeze program anyway, so if a team got stuck with a bad engine, they will constantly loose for how many season the freeze program is in effect. That just blows!
That's what I was wondering. The teams better work hard to have the best possible engine at China '06. What if a team has an engine failure in China? Will they be allowed to make changes to fix the problem? What if, while fixing that problem, they find some other problem?
If the problem is caused by a component failure then I'm sure they can just replace the part, but if it's a design problem, they can't really change that once the engine freeze takes place. They'll have to have something very powerful but also very reliable. Ferrari / Renault seem to be the only ones with powerful but consistently reliable engines this year. The other teams may have to err more on the side of caution so they aren't stuck with engines that blow up every weekend.

Shiba-Kun said:
They can always try to negotiate with another engine supplier I guess. :hehe
lol!
NEW 2007 F1 teams announced:
Team McLaren Mercedes Ferrari
Panasonic Toyota Ferrari Racing
Super Aguri Ferrari F1
Williams Ferrari F1
Lucky Strike Honda Ferrari F1... :lmao
 

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ARTICLE RE: F1 ENGINE FREEZE FROM SPEEDTV.COM

EXCLUSIVE: FIA Requires F1 Teams to Lodge '07 Engines in Japan
Written by: Adam Cooper RACER Magazine
Nice, France – 8/10/2006


The engine spec raced at this year's Japanese GP will last F1 teams for the next four seasons.

"SPEEDtv.com can reveal that the FIA’s Charlie Whiting has informed the F1 teams of the engine homologation procedures that have been put in place for the end of the season, and they will now have to deliver a definitive engine after either the Japanese or Brazilian GPs.

Following a meeting in Nice on Monday between Max Mosley and the GPMA it was finally agreed that the engine freeze will be brought forward to 2007, and in return the teams were given until October to come up with a definitive engine spec that will last for the next four seasons. The units they submitted in June will now be returned.

A detailed procedure had to be put in place to ensure that all engines submitted are genuine race engines capable of doing two meetings. This will prevent teams from rushing through developments over the next two months which are not yet capable of lasting the distance. The only way round that would be to push the technical limits and then require the driver to run the minimum mileage through the two weekends, at very low rpm.

Whiting’s technical directive number 27 requires every team to hand over an engine for sealing on October 8, at the end of the Japanese GP, the penultimate race of the season. It must have completed two race distances, ie including the Chinese GP. If the team is out of sequence and is unable to provide a two-race engine at that point, it will have to supply one at the end of the Brazilian GP that raced for the first time in Suzuka.

The two-race requirement means that teams can’t get away with handing over an engine at the end of the final race in Brazil which was built especially to do one race – something Renault was able to do last year when Fernando Alonso’s change sequence meant that he had a new engine with one race to go.

Just in case failures or retirements mean that a team is unable to satisfy either of the above requirements, all engines coming to an end of a two-race cycle in Italy and China will also be sealed and kept as back-up. If they are not subsequently required, the teams will get them back. The onus is clearly on a reliable run over the last two or three races, or a team could be stuck with a design that first raced as early as Turkey on August 25-27.

In effect the latest anyone can put an engine into a car and complete the procedures properly is the Japanese GP weekend on October 6-8. Allowing for the obvious logistical problems the engines will have to be built and ready to go some days before that. Actual development and construction of parts will in turn be pushed back.

The one team that could gain a tiny advantage is Honda, since its engines are made in Japan and could arrive at Suzuka at the last minute (Toyota’s engines are built in Cologne). Indeed their best bet could be to put a brand new unit in a Super Aguri on Sunday morning – forcing it to start from the pitlane – and then hope that the driver gets to the end of both that race and Brazil!

Of course European makers could fly a latest spec engine out at the last minute and do the same thing…"
 

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This is just crazy! I bet that engineers at every engine producer except Ferrari and Renault (maybe Mclaren) are frantically developing a new engine spec right now... Ow man, this just sucks... I am obviously a Honda fan, that's why I join this forum, so it's kind of sad seeing my favorite team lost 4 seasons in a row, as they don't have a good engine currently. But what about the other teams? The yota and beemer engine is not relatively powerfull/reliable either. I just don't want to watch a race between Renault, Mclaren, and Ferrari for 4 seasons straight.

*sigh*... The end of F1 for me it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Midi_Amp said:
This is just crazy! I bet that engineers at every engine producer except Ferrari and Renault (maybe Mclaren) are frantically developing a new engine spec right now... Ow man, this just sucks... I am obviously a Honda fan, that's why I join this forum, so it's kind of sad seeing my favorite team lost 4 seasons in a row, as they don't have a good engine currently. But what about the other teams? The yota and beemer engine is not relatively powerfull/reliable either. I just don't want to watch a race between Renault, Mclaren, and Ferrari for 4 seasons straight.

*sigh*... The end of F1 for me it is.
I look at it a little bit differently.

The top engine manufactors are in trouble. If they've pushed the level of engine development to their highest level they might not be able to squeeze as many advances out of their engines as the other teams. Honda, Toyota, etc. who seem to be slightly underpowerd now have an opportunity to fine tune their product, in effect getting a chance to catch-up to the more advanced engines.

Suspension, chasis, etc. development is a sperate topic, but that's just how I see the engine freeze. The glass is half full! WOOT!!:w00t
 
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