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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright well I've decided to try and paint my car because it costs way too much for someone else to do it. I think if I take time researching it and practicing it I'll be able to paint my car decent enough. I just need some help from some veteran painters on this forum to point me in the right direction, such as tools and maybe some helpful guides you have found.

I found this one site that I googled and the site makes it seem easy enough to paint a car. http://www.neilslade.com/Papers/Painting.html so I'm guessing it'll cost me around 500$ to get all the tools I need and the paint. I'm wanting to paint my car grey, since that is the original color of the car.
Thanks in advance,
Sam
 

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Advice from a painter

I'd recommend against painting you car yourself if you think you're gonna save money. To buy the right tools for the job, as well as paint and other materials, unless you're gonna paint 3 or 4 cars, it's cheaper to get someone else to do it. I work in a body shop, and getting the materials at cost (and using the tools that are there) I'm still looking at almost $500. Then again, if you decide to cheap out on the paint and go single stage, you might be able to get away with it. Also, make sure that you check the cfm and psi requirements of your spray gun before you buy an air compressor, otherwise, your paint gun won't work.

Also, your paint will only look as good as the bodywork underneath it. Any dings or sctatches will show up through your new paint.

My Integra is painted Porsche's "marashinorot," which runs around $100/quart, and it takes between 2-1/2 and 3 quarts for good coverage, as well as another $75 worth of clear coat, plus the thinners and hardeners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's not that I want to save money on painting my own car, it's just I really want to learn to do it. Money isn't the problem so I'll probably just go buy the materials and start practicing on junk parts from pull a part. Whats the point of thinners and hardners...also would you use a sander to get rid of scratches and then get some fine grit sand paper?
 

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Hey what's up what kind of gun are you using, i use a snap-on hvlp and it has work for 8-10 years with my dad till he had bought a new one. What the thinner does is it will thin down the paint so you can spray at such a high velocity, now with hardeners they serve two purposes they will make the paint more durabull and will also increase the shine in which the paint has. Now their is no need to put hardener in primer, but make sure you have it in your clear and/or base coat. Now if you are putting clear on your car that is the hardest part in learning to paint a car it can become hazy and it runs easily to, and clear isn't cheap. You will need some high grit sandpaper if you have every heard the term of "orange peel" that is what wet sanding will decrease.The only real thing to do is to use plenty of water. Now the finishing product will all determine on how good the quality of the paint and everything else. I have had very bad results with eBay paint but could be cheap paint to practice on spare parts, it will fad easily about 6-9 months after application and looks really bad.Later
 

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Well, since you're not concerned with saving money, I say go for it. I absolutely love it. That said, don't let your first few attempts discourage you. I'm not sure what type of paint you are using, but the type I recommend is Nexa Autocolour. They offer a variety of paints to suit your budget, and keep their shine extremely well. Also, with the Autocolour system, you can mix and match your paints. For example, you can use the premium "2K" base coat paint (the only paint certain colours are available in) and then use the cheaper "Valupro" clearcoat. The Valupro clear gives an amazing wet-look shine. As for your scratches, go over your entire car with a grease and wax remover (otherwise your paint will be all splotchy and "fish-eyed." Then, sand your entire car with 400 grit sand paper. Any dings or deep scratches may requir a skim coat (VERY thin) of metal glaze, deeper once will need a polyester filler. These fills should be sanded with 220 grit paper, then primed with a "high build" primer, and the primer sanded with 400. Once your sanding andn priming are done, go over your entire car with a final wipe solvent to remove any dirt, dust, fingerprints, etc.. that may now be one it. You are now ready for your basecoat. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for mixing ratios (basecoat usually 1 part paint to one part thinner), clearcoat (four parts clear, one part hardener and a half capfull of fisheye reducer). Remember that it is better to use more thin coats then thick ones, as thick ones will run. Usually 3-4 coast of basecoat and 2-3 coats of clear. Your clearcoat is the trickiest one to spray, basecoat is very fogiving. Clear will be full of orangepeel if it's too thin, and run if it's too thick. That said, you can buff out runs, but not necessarily orangepeel. Just take your time, and wear a proper respirator. If you have any questions, ask the guy who mixes the paint at your local autopaints store, they are usually very knowledgeable and helpful.
 
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