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Which kit?

  • Greddy

    Votes: 8 22.9%
  • Drag3

    Votes: 7 20.0%
  • Rev hard

    Votes: 8 22.9%
  • F-max

    Votes: 6 17.1%
  • custom

    Votes: 6 17.1%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going turbo pretty soon. I need to know which kit i should get or should I get custom? I have 3000.00 to spent and 1,000.00 just in case I blow my motor. My car is a daily driver and I need it to last. Mostly city driving and highway driving. So help me pick a kit or help choose the right parts for a custom kit.
 

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go Greddy and Build the Motor with the money u saved. Plus it's Carb legal:eek:
 

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i say completely custom!
 

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i say F-Max they are the sh*t. Drag Gen 3 are pretty good too if you got friends that has saws and welders in there garage. Little cheaper than F-Max. Lets buy 440cc injectors and tune it with your V-AFC but F-Max is tight with the injectors and the AIC in the package. good for 280 hp i heard. and great for daily driving cause of the head gasket that lowers your compression and as long as you keep the boost below 8 psi you should be fine.

Thats just my 2 Cents
 

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Go with Rev Hard you will not be dissapointed.. I have made may arguements why you should pick Rev hard over Drag and i will not get in an argument over this again.. if you want to go fast and have a reliable turbo then go with Rev hard... Rev hard is by far the best designed turbo for stock and built blocks... If you want to read the arguments from both sides why you should choose rev hard over Drag here they are..

http://www.superhonda.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=754

The price you pay is well worth it.. Just trust me and read the posts and i do have a lot of personal experience with Rev hard, and drag...
 

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SohcVtecTurboHB said:
go Greddy and Build the Motor with the money u saved. Plus it's Carb legal:eek:
:confused:

A GReddy kit costs $2900-$3000, without an intercooler...which runs another $700. The Rev Hard is between $3200-$3400 (I sell Rev Hard and GReddy kits). There is no need to build the motor either, it can handle way more than you'll give it on the streets.

Rev Hard
 

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i say go custom... you'll be all familiar with your parts and in my opinion, you'll just know how they work more than the average person with a bolt on kit...
 

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Go custom, you'll learn more about your car and
its cheaper too, and maybe, just maybe you'll
go just as fast depending on alot of things.
Although its jsut my 2 cents. I think it would be
fun to explore a different route that not alot
of people have tried. Try it and tell us how
it turns out! Blaze ;)
 

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Going custom won't make you learn any more than buying a kit. The parts that come in a kit will have to be aquired if you go custom anyway, so why not just buy a pre-fabricated kit that is specifically tested and designed to work on your motor application?

Going custom is alright for people who know what they are doing, but I wouldn't recommend a newbie try to go custom...
 

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I agree with MatT3T4. With custom you can do little more then a kit can (SS manifold, choice of wastegate, ect..), but the out come is very much the same for a daily driver. It real comes down to downtime, MONEY, fabrication (who's going to doing it), and what the turbo setup is mainly for (trailer queen, or street racing).
 

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MatT3T4 said:
Going custom won't make you learn any more than buying a kit..................

Going custom is alright for people who know what they are doing, but I wouldn't recommend a newbie try to go custom...
Umm, first you say that you won't learn anymore from fabricating a kit than you would from just buying one, but then go on to say that you have to know what you're doing to make your own kit.......That's a contradiction.

I don't mean to get critical, it's just that I've spent the last 8 months fabricating my own kit, and though it was more expensive, very tedious, and extremely time-consuming, I'd say I know more than about %80 of the people out there that have simply installed bolt-on, pre-fab kits to their cars, though I haven't even intalled my kit yet (spring break, wooohoo!) If you have plastic (bad idea!) or deep pockets, then going custom is awesome, because you control EVERY facet of how your ride is going to turn out.

I have more peace-of-mind making my own kit than I would from just buying one, though that may be hard to believe. If you really get into custom work, instead of being afraid that you left something out, you'll be able to identify and be afraid of what kit makers leave out of their products. That is such a great feeling, believe me.

Just my $.02

Nick
 

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Nikolai said:


Umm, first you say that you won't learn anymore from fabricating a kit than you would from just buying one, but then go on to say that you have to know what you're doing to make your own kit.......That's a contradiction.


Nick
How is that a contradiction? That isn't a contradiction at all. :confused:

What more is there to learn? You will end up with all of the same parts anyway. If you get a kit, in a box, and hand it to an installer, then you won't learn shit, but who does that? You get the kit, check out all of the parts, and see what each one does, and then install it...simple as that. It's not like turbo kits are rocket science...

But, on the other hand. If you try to piece together a kit, and don't know what you are looking for...you will end up fucking yourself...and spending for too much time and money chasing down parts...
 

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h23zero said:
I agree with MatT3T4. With custom you can do little more then a kit can (SS manifold, choice of wastegate, ect..), but the out come is very much the same for a daily driver. It real comes down to downtime, MONEY, fabrication (who's going to doing it), and what the turbo setup is mainly for (trailer queen, or street racing).
I also disagree with the point that you "can do little more than a kit can."...

Not only do you choose manifold material, but size, shape, wastegate placement, flow characteristics, etc. You can choose from a zillion different companies that do ceramic/heat treatments. You can opt for larger/smaller diameter IC piping, intercooler size/shape/flow characteristics, gauges (EGT is much more accurate than a/f, but you don't see kit-makers including that, do you?!), an ENDLESS number of fuel management/delivery options (FPR's, standalone/piggyback ECU's, upgraded injector size/brand/type, in-tank/in-line fuel pumps, FMU's, MAP bypasses, etc, etc...), IC interconnect tube COLOR (for you show-ers out there), turbo A/R ratios/trim/exducer sizing/water-cooled, downpipe size/placement, air filter size/type, oil/water line type/size, plus a ton of other things I surely forgot.....

I tell you, I've learned so much, and I'm excited to see how my set-up compares to the pre-fabs on the market.

Hopefully this opens the eyes to some of you that are truly interested in knowing your project-to-be inside and out! Keep an eye on my posts for updates/info about my project.

Nick
 

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MatT3T4 said:


It's not like turbo kits are rocket science...

Sorry if you can't see your contradiction.........It's pretty obvious to me. And yes, turbo kits are rocket science. It's just a matter of how deep you want to go.....

There was once a little group of people called NASA who were charged with building a "jet engine". The jet engine had something called a turbine and a compressor (sound familiar?) Back when this "jet engine" was being designed, the only way they could get it to work was to actually hook an electric motor up to the shaft, because it actually could not run under its own power. After YEARS of research, the day came when they could take the motor off the shaft, and the engine would actually run under it's own power. It couldn't even make any thrust, but could merely spin without outside help. This day is now a milestone in engineering history..........rocket science history, actually....

Thanks to NASA and other institutions of its type, we have turbochargers, using very similar technology, to make our little Honda motors have an even higher specific output than has already been attained. On the surface, it's a $3000 turbo kit, but underneath, it's damned amazing.

It's this amazing stuff that I'm interested in, and it's this amazing stuff that educates people like me to build a better turbo kit.

I don't mean to flame, but there's a lot more out there than people care to know, and for you people that do care to know, shoot me an email anytime.

Nick
 

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read between the lines, man. When I said "liitle things" I meant there are more option open to you then a off the shelf kit. Oh, yea just because you built yours, doesn't mean crap. Yes, you built it and you know what you have and where you put it, but that alone doesn't mean you know more about a turbo then me or anybody here that installs their own turbo kits.
 
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